A muesli even muesli haters will love (FODMAP friendly)

I’m over the moon happy for several reasons.

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ONE – I have a job!

TWO – I’ve just finished reading a book! An entire book! The first book I’ve read in over four months and it feels like a huge and wonderful achievement given how difficult trying to find time to read anything has been lately. (If you’re interested, the book was Caitlin Moran’s How to be a Woman which I bought on Emily Cooks Vegan‘s recommendation months ago…and I’m so glad I did – the book is laugh out loud funny and smart and I loved it – thanks Emily!)IMG_1119

And THREE – After nearly four years I’ve managed to find a breakfast that my boyfriend prefers to Weetabix! Before I met my boyfriend, I would have struggled to believe that anyone could happily eat Weetabix every. single. day. I find it hard enough trying to understand why anyone would want to eat the exact same breakfast every day, let alone Weetabix. Because I really just don’t get Weetabix. It doesn’t look appetising, doesn’t taste appetising and I find its texture – either cardboard dry or palpy mush – a bit of an issue.

IMG_1054But anyway, this better-than-Weetabix breakfast I’ve managed to get my boyfriend hooked on (and ok, yes, he is now eating this everyday instead!) is home-made muesli.

So why is this muesli better than Weetabix, aside from the fact that, personally, I think anything is better than Weetabix?IMG_1060Firstly, we’re talking Bircher Muesli, the stuff you soak in milk, or juice overnight, resulting in soft, creamy oats come the morning. I know some people really struggle with cold, soaked oats. And I can understand that. But for me, overnight-soaked oats are 100% my thing.

So we have our oaty, creamy base, which also happens to be deliciously flavoured with cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger. Using chopped, crystallised ginger is a genius idea – as you’d expect from Joy the Baker, where this recipe originates from – the warming sweetness seeping out to flavour the milk as it sits soaking away in the fridge overnight.IMG_1066

Dried cranberries and raisins also do something special when left to bathe in liquid for some time, swelling up to maximum squidgyness.

And then we have toasted nuts and seeds to bring a helping of crunchyness to the soft, creamy oatyness. And this is what cinches the deal for my boyfriend – texture contrast…And that sweet gingeryness – he’s a sucker for sweetness.

Finally, we have toasted coconut flakes. I have so much time for coconut right now, although I definitely never used to. As a kid, Bounty was to chocolate bar as Weetabix still is to cereal – a disappointment. But today, toasted coconut absolutely makes sense.IMG_1075

I guarantee, make this muesli once and you’ll be anxiously forward planning the second batch before you’re more than half way through the first.

Toasted oat, coconut and ginger muesli

Adapted from Joy the Baker

FODMAP note – the only potentially not-so-FODMAP friendly ingredients here are the nuts and dried fruit, although they should be in small enough portions not to cause too many problems. Use almond milk in place of cows milk if you malabsorb lactose.

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  • 400g oats
  • 50g coconut flakes
  • 70g nuts of your choice (I like a mix of almond, hazelnut and pecan)
  • 30g pumpkin seeds
  • 60g dried cranberries
  • 60g raisins
  • 85g crystallised ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Place the oats of a large baking tray and the nuts, seeds and coconut flakes on another and place the trays in the preheated oven. Remove the coconut/nut/seed tray as soon as the coconut starts to turn a golden brown (about 5 mins) this can happen pretty quickly though, so keep a close eye. Continue to toast the oats for about 10-15 minutes in total until fragrant.
  2. Roughly chop the toasted nuts once they’re cool enough to handle.
  3. Combine the oats, nuts, seeds, coconut flakes, dried fruit, ginger, ground spices and salt in a large bowl and your done.
  4. Once everything is cool, transfer to a sealed container.
  5. To serve the muesli, portion out as much as you think you’d like to eat in a bowl the night before. Pour over milk or almond milk to just cover everything. Cover the bowl with cling film and refrigerate overnight. Add extra milk to serve if you prefer things a little looser, and top with some fresh fruit if liked.IMG_1131
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11 thoughts on “A muesli even muesli haters will love (FODMAP friendly)

  1. I would actually be tempted to try this if I had the time – and will be if one day I do. At present I eat a so-called ‘gloriously nutty’ muesli, but am aware that it should be easy to make for myself with just a bit of time. I use rice milk, which I am happy with as an alternative to overdoing dairy products, but notice your use of almond milk. H’m! I must look out for that.

  2. I like Bircher muesli so will be giving this a try. Will it be ok without the coconut flakes – my pet hate – or is there a substitute?

    • Great! Yes, I don’t think it will be any worse off without the coconut…you could maybe add another type of nut or seed for extra variety, but there’s already a fair bit going on! I think the most important bit (and definitely so in Pete’s books!) is the crystallised ginger, which adds a nice sweetness and flavour as the sugar dissolves into the milk. And then the tart cranberries make a nice contrast to the sweet ginger… Will be interested to see what you think.

  3. YES! So happy I perved this website out from the bundle of MA Magazine Journos on Facebook! I’m a huge Meusli boy and I actually tried this recipe. It.is.great. Toasted nuts are the nuts. By the way congrats on getting accepted – I was in your group, I think. Blooming interesting to see who else got through isn’t it?! Mmmm Meusli.

      • Until mid-September, yes. Then Berlin, then looking forward to Cardiff. Struggling to get my head in Teeline Gold Standard for Journalists, though. I’ve learned more about Muesli

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